Om OK Förlaget

Om OK-Förlaget

De första 70 åren ägnade vi oss åt att föra Vi Bilägare till positionen som landets största oberoende biltidning. Det är en ställning vi med marginal behåller, TS-upplagan 2008 var 137 100 exemplar.

2001 köpte vi tidningen Automobil och sedan har expansionen fortsatt i rask takt: startat Klassiker (2004), startat Riksettan (2005), köpt Bike och MC-Nytt (2006) samt startat Husbil & Husvagn (2008). Bike har dessutom verksamhet i Danmark, Finland och Norge.

Förlaget ger även ut one shots, bland andra Begköpguiden, Allt om Miljöbilar, Bike Custom och Bike Test.

 

För kontakt angående våra titlar, beställa tidningar eller prenumeration vänligen använd nedanstående data:

 

 

Kontaktinformation

OK Förlaget AB
Motorvärlden Shop
Box 23800
104 35 Stockholm

E-post: kundservice@motorvarlden.se
Tel. 08-736 12 00

 

 

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  • 09/30/2014 - 18:00

    Porsche Cayman vs Porsche Cayman - Fifth Gear


    Porsche Cayman vs Porsche Cayman - Fifth Gear

    It may seem odd to have a head-to-head with the same car, but one Porsche has a manual gearbox and the other has a semi-auto gearbox. Marcus Grönholm joins Jason to find out which is best....
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  • 09/25/2014 - 18:00

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    In this classic clip, Tiff is testing out the Campagna T-Rex 1400RR. Even though the weather conditions aren't the best to drive, it's still a thrill round the track. For more fantastic car...
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  • 09/23/2014 - 18:00

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  • 10/01/2014 - 01:01

    New Aston Martin Lagonda design secrets revealed

    New Aston Martin Lagonda design secrets revealed

    A Lagonda saloon is back in Aston Martin’s range after a 40-year absence – and it’s a stunner
    Getting to see Aston Martin’s pre-production Lagonda super-luxury saloon is not the most straightforward of tasks.At the entrance to the company’s Warkwickshire headquarters, I jump into an Aston Rapide with design chief Marek Reichman, in order to get to the well hidden unit where a verification prototype of the new car is waiting.The security detail at the super-clean facility – originally constructed to build the One-77 hypercar – appears none too happy with our attempts to gain access to the Lagonda, but eventually, after swipe-carding our way through three doors, I’m led into a darkened room. The overhead lights are switched on and, as they flicker into life, the Lagonda is revealed for the first time. Aston Martin couldn’t have choreographed a more Bond-like reveal of the car if it tried. I can’t help but expect Desmond Llewelyn’s Q to step forward and say: “Now pay attention, Bond.”The first Lagonda production car in nearly four decades (nobody seems quite sure when the final example of the dramatically wedge-shaped Lagonda saloon, launched originally in 1976, left Aston’s production lines), this new saloon has surprised industry watchers who expected to see the Lagonda badge reborn on an upmarket SUV. Stuck in the window of the first door we passed through was a sheet of A4 paper bearing the words ‘Project Comet’. Reichman says the Lagonda project was known as ‘Comet’ from the outset. “Comets are internationally understood and have been believed to be a harbinger of the future and often a guiding light,” he explains. “We thought that was entirely appropriate for this project.”Work on the 5.4-metre-long machine began just 18 months ago in Aston Martin’s design studio. “We always have ideas kicking around the studio and we always have ideas about what we could do with Lagonda,” says Reichman. Aston is aiming the new – and as yet unnamed – car directly at the Middle East market, from where, Reichman says, there has been “specific market demand” for this type of vehicle. But why did Reichman and his design team so specifically reference one of Aston’s more controversial and uncompromising historic vehicles?Reichman estimates that 60-70 per cent of the surviving examples of the last production Lagonda model are now in the Middle East, which is partly why the new Lagonda is such a clear tribute to William Towns’ uncompromisingly edge-shaped 1976 original. “The Middle East is a unique place and Towns’ Lagonda was very different,” says Reichman.“Lagonda has an impeccable heritage. It was a Le Mans winner in the pre-war era and was part of the avant-garde; it was always offering something different. David Brown bought the Lagonda brand [in 1947] and commissioned William Towns to stick with that. It [the 1976 Lagonda] was an attractive aesthetic; it was the lowest four-door car with a remarkably low roofline. It had daring interior technology and was a very brave car.”It is very hard to scale the new Lagonda in this immaculate and nearly all-white room, but it is clearly an imposing machine, even if its size is well disguised by the low beltline and steeply raked windscreen.In fact, the new car is a remarkable 5.4m long (5396.5mm, to be exact). That’s around half a metre longer than the Rapide and just a few millimetres shorter than the Rolls-Royce Ghost. The 3189mm wheelbase should open up significant space in the rear, although the doors of this development car remain frustratingly locked. Rumours are that the V12-powered Lagonda will hit a real-world 175mph.This was a remarkably swiftly executed project, with just eight months separating the first studio sketches from the final full-size model. Lessons were clearly learnt from the One-77 project, which took two years from first sketches to production. “From the first scale models, we just knew it would be right,” says Reichman. “When the first model was revealed, the reaction was, ‘Wow’.“This car is not retrospective. There’s a feeling of drama with the low nose, the continuous flat face and the speed of the A-pillars. The rear of the roofline pulls up over the rear edge of the roof, emphasising the importance of the rear passengers.” “We call this car a ‘super-sport sedan’,” Reichman continues. “It’s very powerful at the rear, and very wide at the rear. The rear track is the widest we have ever done.” Reichman points out the substantial flat shoulder that runs down the side of the car and into what he refers to as the rear deck. He says it’s a reference to the classic Riva powerboat, and apparently it’s one of the design’s most praised reference points.In the metal, the new Lagonda is a mighty machine, which, despite what I would call some significant juxtapositions of design language, hangs together in an unexpected manner. Although there are no razor-sharp edges of the type that Towns put into production in the 1976 car, the new Lagonda mixes the impression of edginess with what are surprisingly voluptuous surfaces, such as the way the rear wing and rear door skin enclose the super-wide rear axle and huge wheels.The whole back end of the Lagonda – or at least the volume under the bootlid – really does appear to wrap itself into a kind of rounded boat tail. It helps to reduce the visual bulk of the car behind the rear axle (where it has something of an overhang when viewed directly from the side), but it also provides an unexpected contrast to the chromed lower edges of the side glazing and the leading edge of the C-pillars. It’s a pity that Reichman decided not to risk a big, wide and completely flat C-pillar panel, as on the car’s predecessor; instead, the surface is broken up by a pressed-in wavy edge.The needle nose of the original could never remotely be alluded to in today’s legislation-heavy climate, so we get incredibly slim headlights, powered by LED units which are doing so much to radically transform the possibilities of headlight design.The Lagonda is constructed from panels moulded from carbonfibre-reinforced plastic (CFRP), which are, in turn, partly bonded directly to the aluminium surfaces of Aston’s VH platform.One of the most impressive things about the Lagonda is its liquid-like surfaces. They might look like precision-pressed steel, but what Reichman’s design team has achieved with a moulded material is highly impressive.“Endless work was done on the surface quality and surface finish,” explains Reichman. “We work so that panel highlights on the surfaces of our models are replicated exactly. A painted surface looks like the surface as it is released by my department.”Certainly, the almost flawless and highly polished surface language is probably the defining achievement of the nine years of the Reichman era at Aston Martin.Achieving this with CFRP panels is easier in the sense that the material is more stable in very hot conditions (the panels on steel and alloy cars will move in hot weather), but it’s much harder in that CFRP is a surface on which it is often more difficult to achieve a perfectly flawless paint finish.Reichman points out that Aston has its own patented coating which goes directly on to the CFRP panels before being given “seven layers of paint and 21 hours of lacquer and polishing”. Reichman hints that this shift towards CFRP panels made in relatively short-lived tooling could become increasingly common as the manufacturer exploits its ability to build the expensive, limited-run models which are highly prized by the world’s super-rich.Although the Lagonda production run will be very exclusive (“into three figures”), it is not yet sold out. It was, however, developed with some of Aston’s “most important” clients in the development loop. They were allowed to see progress on the project right from the design stage and were, according to Reichman, “over the moon” about the finished car.The Lagonda saloon will be made in the same small skunkworks facility that built Aston’s dramatic One-77 hypercar. The first examples are scheduled for delivery early next year, and the production run will finish before the year is out. I get the sense that Aston will build more of these short-run specials. Buyers get something that is rare and exclusive, while Aston should benefit from significant profit margins that can be reinvested in future products. In short, everyone is happy. A mix of mainstream models and these short-run cars could combine to become a business model that will allow Aston to flourish with a relatively small output. After all, with Mercedes-AMG supplying the basic transmission and electrical architecture – the two areas of development that are stupendously expensive – the British company can concentrate on design and craftsmanship.Get the latest car news, reviews and galleries from Autocar direct to your inbox every week. Enter your email address below:

  • 10/01/2014 - 00:01

    Honda unveils facelifted CR-V ahead of Paris debut

    Honda reveals facelifted CR-V ahead of Paris debut

    New diesel engine and styling tweaks for fourth-generation Honda SUV, which goes on sale in March
    The Honda CR-V, revealed here in official photographs, has undergone a significant mid-life refresh, receiving cosmetic tweaks and a new diesel powertrain.Four-wheel-drive variants of the fourth-generation CR-V – which has been on sale since 2012 – will now be offered with a higher-powered 1.6-litre i-DTEC four-cylinder diesel engine from Honda’s Earth Dreams Technology series. The new engine variant replaces the 2.2-litre i-DTEC diesel, which is being phased out.The new diesel engine produces 158bhp and 258lb ft. CO2 emissions are claimed to be less than 130g/km of CO2, when the engine is coupled to a six-speed manual transmission, which represents an 11 per cent improvement compared to the outgoing unit.This engine will also now be offered with a new nine-speed automatic transmission in place of the old five-speed self-shifting 'box. The CO2 emissions for this combination will be less than 135g/km, 20 per cent better than its predecessor.The two-wheel-drive CR-V, available with a six-speed manual transmission, will continue to be offered with the lower-powered version of the 1.6 litre i-DTEC diesel engine. It's the frugal champion in the range, producing 118bhp and emitting 117g/km of CO2 in its most economical guise.The existing 2.0-litre petrol engine will continue to be offered with either two- or four-wheel drive and either the manual or automatic five-speed transmission. Official economy and performance figures have yet to be confirmed, however.The most significant cosmetic tweaks across the range are at the front of the car, which receives new headlamps, front grille, fog lights, skid-plate and bumper. The enhancements at the rear include new LED combination lamps, a refreshed tailgate design and bumper.Honda says the version of the CR-V sold in the UK and Europe has been specifically developed and engineered to suit driving conditions here. The car will continue to be built at Honda’s plant in Swindon.Customers will be able to order the facelifted model next March, and the car will be seen in the metal for the first time at the Paris motor show later this week.Honda will also show its latest Type R concept at the Paris show, alongside its reborn HR-V crossover, the new Jazz and the updated Civic range.Read more Paris motor show newsGet the latest car news, reviews and galleries from Autocar direct to your inbox every week. Enter your email address below:

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